(1) Countering Objections to Space Settlement (2) Urban-focused satellite CO2 observations from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-3: A first look at the Los Angeles megacity

August 7, 2021 @ 10:00 am 12:30 pm PDT

(Saturday, August 7, 2021) (1) Countering Objections to Space Settlement (2) Urban-focused satellite CO2 observations from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-3: A first look at the Los Angeles megacity

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AIAA LA-LV e-Town Hall Meeting 8/7

Saturday, August 7, 2021, 10 AM PDT

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(Part I) (10:10 AM – 11:20 AM PDT (GMT -0700))
Countering Objections to Space Settlement
by
Mr. Al Globus

Contract software engineer, NASA Ames Research Center – Retired
AIAA Space Colonization Technical Committee
NSS Board of Directors
——————————————————-
(Part II)(11:20 AM – 12:30 PM PDT (GMT -0700))
Urban-focused satellite CO2 observations from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-3:
A first look at the Los Angeles megacity
by
Dr. Matthäus Kiel

Research Scientist
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
——————————————————-

(Part I)
Countering Objections to Space Settlement
Space settlement is moving from the fringe of space conversations towards the center. As this happens some will object to one or more aspects of space settlement. Most of these objections have been heard before. Indeed, since space settlement became part of the discussion with Gerard O’Neill’s work on free space settlements in the 1970s, many of the same objections have surfaced again and again. The space settlement movement, including this author, has some experience responding to these attacks. This presentation is intended to be a place to find rebuttals to objections to space settlement. For each objection there are talking points and a brief discussion.

Mr. Al Globus worked at NASA Ames for 39 years as a contract software engineer on space settlement, asteroid mining, Hubble, space stations, X37, shuttle, Earth observation, TDRSS, cubesats, lunar teleoperation, spaceflight effects on bone, molecular nanotechnology, scientific visualization, and space solar power publishing dozens of papers on these and other topics. He founded and has run the annual NSS Space Settlement Contest for 7-12 grade students for over 25 years. The contest attracted 14,000 kids in 2020. Most recently, he found a way to build O’Neill-style space settlements with multiple orders of magnitude less mass and place them close to Earth, making launch from Earth practical.

Al is a member of the NSS Board of Directors, chairman of the Space Settlement Advocacy Committee, member of the Policy committee, and sits on the board of the Alliance for Space Development.
——————————————————-
(Part II)
Urban-focused satellite CO2 observations from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-3:
A first look at the Los Angeles megacity
The NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 and -3 (OCO-2 and OCO-3) are the first NASA space-based sensors designed to measure carbon dioxide (CO2) from space with the precision and coverage needed to identify the sources emitting it into the atmosphere and the natural processes that absorb it at the surface.

Whereas OCO-2 (launched in 2014) provides global maps of column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of carbon dioxide (XCO2) with a 16-day repeat cycle, OCO-3 is specifically designed to support the identification and quantification of anthropogenic CO2 emissions on regional scales (<100km). OCO-3 was launched on May 4, 2019 from Kennedy Space Center via a Space-X Falcon 9 rocket. The instrument was installed two days later as an external payload on the International Space Station (ISS). OCO-3’s new Snapshot Area Map (SAM) and target mode observations provide an innovative dataset for carbon studies on sub-city scales. Unlike any other current space-based instrument, OCO-3 has the ability to scan large contiguous areas (up to 80km x 80km) of emission hot spots like cities, power plants, and volcanoes. These measurements result in dense, fine-scale spatial maps of XCO2.

Here we present XCO2 distributions over the Los Angeles megacity (LA) derived from the very first OCO-3 SAM and target mode observations taken in October 2019 and early 2020. Urban XCO2 enhancements range from 0 − 6 parts per million (ppm) relative to a clean background. OCO-3’s SAM observations reveal intra-urban variations of XCO2 over the city that have never been observed from space before. The spatial variations are mainly driven by the complex fossil fuel emission patterns and meteorological conditions in the LA Basin. In the future, OCO-3’s frequent target and SAM mode observations will play a major role in quantifying anthropogenic emissions over urban areas world wide. These measurements can help to monitor the effectiveness and progress of localized CO2 emission reduction policies.

Dr. Matthäus Kiel is a Research Scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Since obtaining his Ph.D. in Physics at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany), his research has focused primarily on the retrieval of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations from multiple remote sensing platforms (satellite, airborne, ground-based). Dr. Kiel conducted his postdoctoral studies at the California Institute of Technology with focus on the terrestrial carbon cycle, addressing cross-cutting challenges in the anthropogenic footprint of carbon and its relationship to air quality. Presently, Dr. Kiel is a member of the OCO-2 and OCO-3 science and validation teams at JPL. He provides science support for the development of retrieval algorithms and has extensive experience in validating satellite products against independent measurements. Further, Dr. Kiel is part of the MAIA science team at JPL and works on the quality assessment of aerosol and particular matter measurements from space. He works closely with all project teams including calibration, algorithm, validation, and mission planning.
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Disclaimer: The views of the speakers do not represent the views of AIAA or the AIAA Los Angeles-Las Vegas Section.

AIAA LA-LV Section | [https://aiaa-lalv.org][events.aiaalalv@gmail.com]

Details

Date:
August 7, 2021
Time:
10:00 am – 12:30 pm PDT
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Website:
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Organizer

AIAA Los Angeles-Las Vegas Section
Phone:
(949)426-8175
Email:
events.aiaalalv@gmail.om
Website:
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The 3rd AIAA LA-LV Space Architecture Gathering

March 27, 2021 @ 10:00 am 3:30 pm PDT

The 3rd AIAA LA-LV Space Architecture Gathering

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Online Instructions: Url: http://aiaa.zoom.us

Login: Please RSVP/register on https://conta.cc/3e0r1Bh and the Zoom link will be in the Confirmation email that will be sent right away / shortly after the success registration/RSVP. If not in the Inbox, please check the Spam / Junk folder and pull it out. It should not take too long. Contact events.aiaalalv@gmail.com if any question. Thank you very much !

Disclaimer: The views of the speakers do not represent the view of AIAA or the AIAA Los Angeles-Las Vegas Section.

Saturday, March 27, 2021, 10 AM PDT (GMT -7)

Welcome and Opening by
Dr. Dan Dumbacher
(AIAA Executive Director)

led and moderated by
Prof. Madhu Thangavelu
USC Astronautical Engineering Department and USC School of Architecture

 

USC Astronautical Engineering Department and USC School of Architecture

The 3rd International AIAA LA-LV Space Architecture Gathering
Saturday March 27th, 2021, 10:00am-3:30pm (Add to Calendar)
Pacific Daylight Time PDT (GMT -7)(Los Angeles, US, and Canada)
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Space Architects are involved in proposing visions and a variety of concepts for habitation in extreme environments that include human space activity, especially for near term missions. Preintegrated, deployable, erectable and hybrid structures that use local resources are sought. Visions range from habitats in Earth Orbit, on the Moon, Mars and in cislunar space.

Here on Earth, several simulations have provided insight into crew needs and behavior and many more are planned or in various stages of development. Out of these missions, exercises and proposals are also born energy and resource conscious designs for immediate applications on Earth, in specialized facilities and in our smart cities, and dwellings.

This international gathering of space architects will present some visions and projects being contemplated for both space and Earth applications.

Event will conclude with a panel discussion.
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Tentative Agenda Space Architecture Gathering for Saturday March 27th, 2021

(Note: Pacific Daylight Time=PDT (GMT-0700))

Let us go from Earth orbit to Moon to Mars and then Simulators!

 

10:00 AM PDT – Welcome (Dr. Dan Dumbacher, AIAA Executive Director)

10:15 AM PDT: Prof. Madhu Thangavelu (USC) (Moderator, Welcome, Keynote)

10:30 AM PDT: Prof. Sandra Haeuplik-Meusburger – Space Habitats and Habitability, Vienna University of Technology, Austria

10:45 AM PDT: Mr. Vittorio Netti – Human-Robot Collaboration as an Enabler of Scalable Human Presence in Space, SICSA and Politecnico di Milano, Italy

11:00 AM PDT: Prof. Behrokh (Berok) Khoshnevis – Planetary Construction and In-Space Fabrication using Large-Scale 3D printing, Contour Crafting Corporation, CA

11:15 AM PDT: Mr. John Mankins – (TBD), Mankins Space Technology, Inc.

11:30 AM PDT: Ms. R.Pailes-Friedman, Mr. M.Morris, and Ms. Christina Ciardullo – Lunar Lantern & Landing Pad, SEArch+ Architects

11:45 AM PDT: Mr. Rodrigo Romo, Basalt Sintering for ISRU Applications, Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES), Hawaii

12:00 PM PDT: Mr. Daniel Inocente, Advancing Architecture, Integrated Tectonics, Senior Designer, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, New York

12:15 PM PDT: Mr. Giuseppe Calabrese, Urban farming for extreme environment on Mars, Sydney, Australia

12:30 PM PDT: Mr. Jim Rhoné, Building Bioregenerative Worlds, Interstellar Lab, Paris

12:45 PM PDT: Ms. Mahsa Moghimi Esfandabadi – Greenhouse for Partial Gravity: Architecture and Systems Approaches, Independent Space Habitats and Greenhouses Designer, Houston

01:00 PM PDT: Mr. Philip Sadler, Lunar/Mars Greenhouse, Sadler Machine Co. & University of Arizona

01:15 PM PDT: Ms. Mirha Vlahovljak, HiveMars: Design of a Hybrid-class, scalable Settlement on the Martian Surface, Polytechnic University of Bari, Italy

01:30 PM PDT: Prof. Michael Fox,  A Brief Overview of the CPP NASA X-Hab, CalPoly Pomona, CA.

01:45 PM PDT: Mr. Xavier de Kestelier, The Value of Design: Mars Habitat, Hassell Architects, FL

02:00 PM PDT: Mr. Sebastian Frederiksen, LUNARK – 100 days Lunar analog in an unfolding habitat in the arctic, SAGA Space Architects, Denmark

02:15 PM PDT: Prof. Pablo de Leon, Planetary Habitat Analogs at the University of North Dakota, University of North Dakota

02:30 PM PDT:  Mr. Kriss J. Kennedy, Architect. A Vision of the Future: Built-in-Place Architectures, USS, Inc / TECHNE’ Architects LLC., Houston

02:45 PM PDT: Discussion

03:30 PM PDT: Adjourn

 

———————–
Prof. Madhu Thangavelu (mthangav@usc.edu)

AIAA LA-LV | aiaa-lalv.org | events.aiaalalv@gmail.com

Details

Date:
March 27, 2021
Time:
10:00 am – 3:30 pm PDT
Event Category:
Event Tags:
, , , , , , , , , ,
Website:
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Organizer

AIAA Los Angeles-Las Vegas Section
Phone:
(949)426-8175
Email:
events.aiaalalv@gmail.om
Website:
aiaa-lalv.org

e-Town Hall Meeting with Mr. Al Globus and Dr. Daniel Clayton

January 30, 2021 @ 10:00 am 1:10 pm PST

(January 30, 2021) e-Town Hall Meeting with Mr. Al Globus and Dr. Daniel Clayton

RSVP and Information: https://conta.cc/3a2tc5f

Volunteers are needed for all AIAA activities, please contact events.aiaalalv@gmail.com

Saturday, January 30, 2021, 10 am PST (Add to Calendar)

AIAA LA-LV e-Town Hall Meeting

Tentative Agenda: (Pacific Standard Time (PST), US/Canada)
10:05 am (PST): Welcome
10:10 am (PST): Mr. Al Globus (Space Settlement: an Easier Way)
11:40 am (PST): Dr. Daniel Clayton (Space Nuclear Systems Launch Safety)
01:10 pm (PST): Adjourn

——————————————–
(Part I)
Space Settlement: an Easier Way
by Mr. Al Globus
Contract software engineer, NASA Ames Research Center – Retired
AIAA Space Colonization Technical Committee
NSS Board of Directors
——————————————–

(Part II)
Space Nuclear Systems Launch Safety
by Dr. Daniel Clayton
Principal Member of the Technical Staff,
Project Manager of the Space Nuclear Systems Launch Safety group,
Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico
——————————————–

RSVP and Information: https://conta.cc/3a2tc5f

Space Settlement: an Easier Way
In the 1970’s Princeton physicist Gerard O’Neill showed that we can build giant spacecraft in free space (in orbit, not on a planet or moon) and live in them. These space settlements could be wonderful places to live; about the size of a California beach town and endowed with weightless recreation, fantastic views, freedom, elbow-room in spades, and great wealth.

As fantastic as Dr. O’Neill’s work is, the space settlements envisioned are too big, too massive, and too far away to be a practical place to start. We now know how to massively reduce the size, mass, and shorten supply lines of early space settlements by:

Placing settlements in a region of low radiation 500-600 km above the equator. Calculations suggest that at 500 km above Earth and zero inclination such settlements may require no radiation shielding.

Making settlements smaller by rotating (to produce pseudo-gravity) at up to four rpm. Settlers will become ill at first but adapt within a few hours or perhaps a day or two.

This reduces the size, distance, and mass of settlement to the point that the vehicles currently in flight test may be sufficient to provide affordable transportation from Earth to settlements.

Space hotel development can provide an incremental path to settlement construction with income along the way.

—————————————-
Mr. Al Globus worked at NASA Ames for 39 years as a contract software engineer on space settlement, asteroid mining, Hubble, space stations, X37, shuttle, Earth observation, TDRSS, cubesats, lunar teleoperation, spaceflight effects on bone, molecular nanotechnology, scientific visualization, and space solar power publishing dozens of papers on these and other topics. He founded and has run the annual NSS Space Settlement Contest for 7-12 grade students for over 25 years. The contest attracted 14,000 kids in 2020. Most recently, he found a way to build O’Neill-style space settlements with multiple orders of magnitude less mass and place them close to Earth, making launch from Earth practical.

Al is a member of the NSS Board of Directors, chairman of the Space Settlement Advocacy Committee, member of the Policy committee, and sits on the board of the Alliance for Space Development.

—————————————-

Space Nuclear Systems Launch Safety
Many of the space exploration missions from the past half-century have been enabled using space nuclear systems to produce heat and electricity. This mission enabling technology provides a stable, enduring energy source for missions that travel to locations in the solar system and beyond where solar power becomes ineffective and temperatures dip low enough to inhibit functionality of key components.

The radioactive nature of the fuel requires that safety and environmental protection be an inherent part of the design. The risks to the public associated with the launch of a space nuclear system in potential launch accidents need to be quantified. These risks are described in a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). During this talk we will discuss the SAR analyses, including the effects of impacts, fires, reentry, accident sequence, atmospheric transport and consequence determination.
—————————————-
Dr. Daniel Clayton is a Principal Member of the Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He is the Project Manager of the Space Nuclear Systems Launch Safety group, simulating and predicting behavior of nuclear components during space launch accidents at Sandia. Dan received his B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Chemical Engineering from Brigham Young University. His areas of expertise include atmospheric transport and dispersion, CFD modeling, consequence analysis, launch accident sequencing, model development/coding, and risk assessments.
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Details

Date:
January 30, 2021
Time:
10:00 am – 1:10 pm PST
Event Category:
Event Tags:
, , , , , , , , ,
Website:
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Organizer

AIAA Los Angeles-Las Vegas Section
Phone:
(949)426-8175
Email:
events.aiaalalv@gmail.om
Website:
aiaa-lalv.org

Space Settlement: an Easier Way (Globus) | Low-Latency Telepresence (Adamo)

December 12, 2020 @ 10:00 am 1:40 pm PST

Space Settlement: an Easier Way by Al Globus | Mars/Space Exploration through Low-Latency Telepresence (LLT) by Daniel R. Adamo

This posting here is for information only, no ticket sales on this Eventbrite page. RSVP / ticket sales please click: RSVP and Information: https://conta.cc/3d9wDGD

Volunteers are needed for all AIAA activities, please contact

cgsonwane@gmail.com

 

Saturday, December 12, 2020, 10 am PST

AIAA LA-LV e-Town Hall Meeting

Space Settlement: an Easier Way

by

Al Globus

Contract software engineer, NASA Ames Research Center – Retired

AIAA Space Colonization Technical Committee

NSS Board of Directors

———————————————————————–

Exploring Solar System / Mars through Low-Latency Telepresence (LLT)

by

Daniel R. Adamo

Independent Aerodynamics Consultant, NASA JSC – Retired

AIAA Distinguished Lecturer

AIAA Associate Fellow

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Tentative Agenda: (Pacific Time, US/Canada)

 

10:05 am: Dr. Chandrashekhar Sonwane (Welcome)

10:10 am: Mr. Al Globus

11:40 am: Mr. Dan Adamo

01:40 pm: Adjourn

———————————————————————–

 

Space Settlement: an Easier Way

 

Al Globus worked at NASA Ames for 39 years as a contract software engineer on space settlement, asteroid mining, Hubble, space stations, X37, shuttle, Earth observation, TDRSS, cubesats, lunar teleoperation, spaceflight effects on bone, molecular nanotechnology, scientific visualization, and space solar power publishing dozens of papers on these and other topics. He founded and has run the annual NSS Space Settlement Contest for 7-12 grade students for over 25 years. The contest attracted 14,000 kids in 2020. Most recently, he found a way to build O’Neill-style space settlements with multiple orders of magnitude less mass and place them close to Earth, making launch from Earth practical.

 

Al is a member of the NSS Board of Directors, chairman of the Space Settlement Advocacy Committee, member of the Policy committee, and sits on the board of the Alliance for Space Development.

 

Description:

 

In the 1970’s Princeton physicist Gerard O’Neill showed that we can build giant spacecraft in free space (in orbit, not on a planet or moon) and live in them. These space settlements could be wonderful places to live; about the size of a California beach town and endowed with weightless recreation, fantastic views, freedom, elbow-room in spades, and great wealth.

 

As fantastic as Dr. O’Neill’s work is, the space settlements envisioned are too big, too massive, and too far away to be a practical place to start. We now know how to massively reduce the size, mass, and shorten supply lines of early space settlements by:

 

Placing settlements in a region of low radiation 500-600 km above the equator. Calculations suggest that at 500 km above Earth and zero inclination such settlements may require no radiation shielding.

Making settlements smaller by rotating (to produce pseudo-gravity) at up to four rpm. Settlers will become ill at first but adapt within a few hours or perhaps a day or two.

This reduces the size, distance, and mass of settlement to the point that the vehicles currently in flight test may be sufficient to provide affordable transportation from Earth to settlements.

Space hotel development can provide an incremental path to settlement construction with income along the way.

 

———————————————————————–

Exploring Solar System / Mars through Low-Latency Telepresence (LLT)

 

Mr. Dan Adamo is an astrodynamics consultant focused on space mission trajectory design, operations, and architecture. He works with clients primarily at NASA and in academia.

 

Until retirement in 2008, Mr. Adamo was employed by United Space Alliance as a trajectory expert, serving as a “front room” flight controller for 60 Space Shuttle missions. Along with console duties during simulations and missions, this job entailed development of trajectory designs, software tools, flight rules, console procedures, and operations concepts. Mr. Adamo began his career at the Perkin-Elmer Corporation where he developed and operated proof-of-concept software for computer-controlled polishing of optical elements. He has degrees in Physical Sciences and Optical Engineering from the University of Houston and the University of Rochester, respectively.

 

Mr. Adamo is an AIAA Associate Fellow and the author of many publications (ref. http://www.aiaahouston.org/adamo_astrodynamics/). He has received numerous awards, including 14 NASA Group Achievement Awards.

 

Description:

 

Why would it make sense to send humans more than 99% of the way to an off-Earth exploration destination like Mars without putting “boots on the ground”? How can average speeds achieved by robotic Mars rovers, typically a leisurely 0.4 meters per hour, be dramatically increased? This 2-hour lecture will answer these questions by suggesting humans operate in synergy with nearby robotic systems as a game-changing space exploration strategy. When command/feedback delays between human explorers and their robotic proxies are reduced sufficiently, today’s user interface technology can impart multi-sensory impressions of “being there”, a state of cognizance called low-latency telepresence (LLT). Using LLT-based strategies, impressive exploration productivity gains are realizable, together with reduced programmatic cost and risk, when compared to more conventional exploration strategies based on the Apollo Program circa 1970. These benefits accrue regardless of whether humans orbit above or loiter on/beneath a nearby exploration region.

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AIAA LA-LV | events.aiaalalv@gmail.com | aiaa-lalv.org

Organizer

AIAA Los Angeles-Las Vegas Section
Phone:
(949)426-8175
Email:
events.aiaalalv@gmail.om
Website:
aiaa-lalv.org